MEDIA RELEASE: MALCOLM TURNBULL AND LIBERALS MUST ACT ON DOMESTIC VIOLENCE LEAVE, WEDNESDAY, 22 AUGUST 2018

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THE HON TANYA PLIBERSEK MP

DEPUTY LEADER OF THE OPPOSITION
SHADOW MINISTER FOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING
SHADOW MINISTER FOR WOMEN
ACTING SHADOW MINISTER FOR EMPLOYMENT AND WORKPLACE RELATIONS
MEMBER FOR SYDNEY

  
MALCOLM TURNBULL AND LIBERALS MUST ACT ON DOMESTIC VIOLENCE LEAVE

The Liberals are consumed with their leadership crisis instead of acting on important issues like domestic violence leave.
 
Despite a number of opportunities to introduce legislation providing for family and domestic violence leave, Malcolm Turnbull and the Liberals have done nothing.
 
Junior Minister Craig Laundy has failed to introduce a bill into the Parliament during this two week sitting period.  It shows the Liberals don’t take family and domestic violence leave seriously.
 
Mr Laundy needs to focus on this extremely important issue which has fallen to the wayside, and stop being distracted by the chaos in the Liberal Party.

More than four months ago, Craig Laundy put out a late night press release saying the government would look at legislating five days unpaid domestic and family violence leave.
 
Two weeks ago, media outlets reported Mr Laundy would introduce legislation to provide for five days unpaid domestic and family violence leave “as soon as possible”.
 
But the Liberals have done nothing.   
 
Labor has committed to introducing 10 days paid domestic violence leave into the National Employment Standards. We have called on the Liberals to join us to provide this crucial workplace right to all Australian workers. They have consistently failed to answer our call.
   
The truth is the Liberals see domestic violence leave as nothing more than a cost to business. They have even made the ridiculous argument that it will make women less attractive to employers.
 
State governments and many private sector employers already provide paid family violence leave, including Carlton & United Breweries, Telstra, NAB, Virgin Australia, IKEA and Qantas. These employers have paved the way and helped reduce the stigma that often accompanies domestic violence. So too have Australia’s unions, campaigning for paid domestic and family violence leave over many years which has led to subsequent coverage in Australian workplaces. 

The complexity of family violence requires a strategic approach by all levels of government, business, and the community.

Labor calls on Malcolm Turnbull and his Liberals to adopt Labor’s commitment to 10 days paid domestic and family violence leave, and to bring legislation forward during the next sitting week.  Nothing less will do.

If you cover this story, or any story regarding violence against women and children, please include the following tagline:

*** If you or someone you know is impacted by sexual assault or family violence, call 1800RESPECT on 1800 737 732 or visit www.1800RESPECT.org.au. In an emergency, call 000” ***
 
WEDNESDAY, 22 AUGUST 2018