TRANSCRIPT: DOORSTOP CANBERRA WEDNESDAY 19 SEPTEMBER 2018

commonwealthcoatofarms_2__1_.png

THE HON TANYA PLIBERSEK MP
DEPUTY LEADER OF THE OPPOSITION
SHADOW MINISTER FOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING
SHADOW MINISTER FOR WOMEN
MEMBER FOR SYDNEY

E&OE TRANSCRIPT
DOORSTOP
CANBERRA
WEDNESDAY 19 SEPTEMBER 2018


SUBJECTS: Superannuation and paid parental leave; National Party’s treatment of Catherine Marriott.

TANYA PLIBERSEK, DEPUTY LEADER OF THE OPPOSITION: [AUDIO CUTS IN] out of the workforce caring for their young families. So Labor's proposal is that we would pay superannuation on paid parental leave and on Dad and Partner pay so that, if mum or dad are taking time out to care for a baby, they're not penalised for doing that in their superannuation. 

JOURNALIST: What sort of effect would that have to the budget bottom line? 
 
PLIBERSEK: This is at a cost of $409 million over the next four years or $2.6 billion over the decade. But this is one part of the change we're making. We're also saying that…at the moment, if you're paid less than $450 a month, you don't get paid super on that. So many more people are working two or three or four casual or part-time jobs. We think that you should get your superannuation on those smaller pay packets as well. So over the next four years, we'd actually get rid of that cap as well, so these two measures together cost about $409 million. 
 
JOURNALIST: Has it got any support from the other side or from crossbenchers or, you know, this is the first time we're hearing of it I'd imagine? 
 
PLIBERSEK: We haven't had any support from the Liberals yet. I expect some support from the crossbench. But this is something that many organisations - women in super, the union movement, others who are interested in superannuation policy, have been arguing for for years. They say that it's just not fair, not right that women are retiring with so much less superannuation than men and that the reason for that is because they're caring for family members. I think this would be very warmly welcomed by most women who are probably scratching their heads and saying: "why has it taken so long?".
 
JOURNALIST: And just to clarify, there's not different rules for a woman or a man if they are going on parental leave?
 
PLIBERSEK: No, no, absolutely not. If you're on paid maternity leave - you'll get it, if you're on dad and partner pay - you'll get it and of course, the same thing with the $450 cut off for superannuation. Those lower paid jobs are mostly done by women, so it's mostly women who will benefit but of course men and women benefit equally in these policies. 
 
JOURNALIST: Is this an election pitch to female voters? 
 
PLIBERSEK: I think if women are looking at the major parties today, they know that there's one party that supports women - we're at almost 50-50 in our own parliamentary representation. It's not - this policy's a real cracker but this is not the only one. 
 
JOURNALIST: What do you make of Catherine Marriott's allegation made on the 7:30 Report last night, talking about Barnaby Joyce?
 
PLIBERSEK: I think Catherine Marriott's interview last night was absolutely commendable. She is a gutsy women. I am full of admiration for the way she spoke up for herself and the hope that she's given other women, good on her. 
 
JOURNALIST: He says it's spurious, defamatory, does that surprise you? 
 
PLIBERSEK: Oh look. I'm not going to comment on what he says. I think Catherine Marriott - her testimony speaks for itself. 
 
JOURNALIST: Thanks for your time. 
 
ENDS